Aqueous extract of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) improves the spatial performance of a rat model of Alzheimer's disease

Soheili-Kashani, M. and Rezaei-Tavirani, M. and Talaei, S.A. and Salami, M. (2011) Aqueous extract of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) improves the spatial performance of a rat model of Alzheimer's disease. Neuroscience Bulletin, 27 (2). pp. 99-106.

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Abstract

Objective: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most important neurodegenerative disorders. It is characterized by dementia including deficits in learning and memory. The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of aqueous extract of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) on spatial performance of AD rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were first divided into control and AD groups. Rat model of AD was established by intracerebroventricular injection of 10 μg Aβ1-42 20 d prior to administration of the lavender extract. Rats in both groups were then introduced to 2 stages of task learning (with an interval of 20 d) in Morris water maze, each followed by one probe test. After the first stage of spatial learning, control and AD animals received different doses (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) of the lavender extract. Results: In the first stage of experiment, the latency to locate the hidden platform in AD group was significantly higher than that in control group. However, in the second stage of experiment, control and AD rats that received distilled water (vehicle) showed similar performance, indicating that the maze navigation itself could improve the spatial learning of AD animals. Besides, in the second stage of experiment, control and AD rats that received lavender extract administration at different doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) spent less time locating the platform (except for the AD rats with 50 mg/kg extract treatment), as compared with their counterparts with vehicle treatment, respectively. In addition, lavender extract significantly improved the performance of control and AD rats in the probe test, only at the dose of 200 mg/kg, as compared with their counterparts with vehicle treatment. Conclusion: The lavender extract can effectively reverse spatial learning deficits in AD rats. © 2011 Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: cited By 24
Uncontrolled Keywords: central nervous system agents; lavandula angustifolia extract; plant extract; unclassified drug, Alzheimer disease; animal experiment; animal model; animal tissue; article; controlled study; drug dose comparison; latent period; lavender; Lavendula angustifolia; learning; male; maze test; memory consolidation; mental performance; nonhuman; rat; recall; spatial learning; spatial memory; task performance, Alzheimer Disease; Amyloid beta-Peptides; Analysis of Variance; Animals; Disease Models, Animal; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Hippocampus; Injections, Intraventricular; Lavandula; Male; Maze Learning; Peptide Fragments; Phytotherapy; Plant Preparations; Rats; Rats, Wistar; Spatial Behavior; Time Factors
Subjects: Neuroscience
Nutrition
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Basic Sciences > Department of physiology
Depositing User: editor . 2
Date Deposited: 27 Feb 2017 05:43
Last Modified: 04 Mar 2017 05:56
URI: http://eprints.kaums.ac.ir/id/eprint/868

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