Bed rest duration after sheath removal following percutaneous coronary interventions: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Mohammady, M. and Atoof, F. and Sari, A.A. and Zolfaghari, M. (2014) Bed rest duration after sheath removal following percutaneous coronary interventions: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23 (11-12). pp. 1476-1485.

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Abstract

Aims and objectives: To explore the effect of bed rest duration after sheath removal following percutaneous coronary interventions on the incidence of vascular complications, back pain and urinary problems. Background: According to the literature, the duration of bed rest after sheath removal following percutaneous coronary interventions ranges from 2-24 hours. Several studies have assessed the effect of duration of bed rest on vascular complications, but a clear final conclusion about the exact duration of bed rest has not been reached. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, IranMedex and IranDoc were searched. No language limitation was applied. RCTs that used two different periods for ambulation were included. Two reviewers separately assessed the quality of each included study and extracted the data. Dichotomous outcomes were recorded as odds ratio with 95 confidence interval. Results: Five studies involving 1115 participants were included in the review. Among them, two studies had three comparison groups. The studies considered a variety of periods as early and late ambulation, ranging from 2-10 hours. Totally, there were no statistically significant differences in the incidence of bleeding, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula and urinary problems between early and late ambulation. There was a statistically significant reduction in the risk of haematoma formation at four to six hours of bed rest compared with eight hours of bed rest (odds ratio = 0·37, 95 CI: 0·15, 0·91). Back pain was reported in one study evaluating three hours of bed rest with an odds ratio of 0·45 (95 confidence interval: 0·28, 0·71) when compared with 10 hours of bed rest. Conclusions: Early ambulation after percutaneous coronary interventions is safe and feasible however, the results should be used with caution as the majority of included studies had methodological flaws. Relevance to clinical practice: The results of this study suggest that patients could be ambulated three to four hours after sheath removal following percutaneous coronary interventions and early ambulation dose does not increase the risk of vascular complications, but it moderates back pain occurrence. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: cited By 1
Uncontrolled Keywords: adverse effects; bed rest; catheterization; femoral artery; human; meta analysis; mobilization; nursing; percutaneous coronary intervention; Postoperative Complications, Bed Rest; Catheterization; Early Ambulation; Femoral Artery; Humans; Percutaneous Coronary Intervention; Postoperative Complications
Subjects: Health Professions
Divisions: Faculty of Health > Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics
Depositing User: editor . 2
Date Deposited: 04 Mar 2017 06:06
Last Modified: 04 Mar 2017 06:06
URI: http://eprints.kaums.ac.ir/id/eprint/547

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