Effects of resistant starch on glycemic control, serum lipoproteins and systemic inflammation in patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials

Halajzadeh, J. and Milajerdi, A. and Reiner, Ž. and Amirani, E. and Kolahdooz, F. and Barekat, M. and Mirzaei, H. and Mirhashemi, S.M. and Asemi, Z. (2019) Effects of resistant starch on glycemic control, serum lipoproteins and systemic inflammation in patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition.

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Abstract

The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of resistant starch (RS) on glycemic status, serum lipoproteins and inflammatory markers in patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and related disorders. Two independent authors systematically searched online database including EMBASE, Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science from inception until 30 April 2019. Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool was applied to assess the methodological quality of included trials. The heterogeneity among the included studies was assessed using Cochrane�s Q test and I-square (I2) statistic. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and weighted mean difference (WMD) was considered as the overall effect size. Nineteen trials were included in this meta-analysis. Administration of RS resulted in significant reduction in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (14 studies) (WMD: �4.28; 95 CI: �7.01, �1.55), insulin (12 studies) (WMD: �1.95; 95 CI: �3.22, �0.68), and HbA1C (8 studies) (WMD: �0.60; 95 CI: �0.95, �0.24). When pooling data from 13 studies, a significant reduction in total cholesterol levels (WMD: �8.19; 95 CI: �15.38, �1.00) and LDL-cholesterol (WMD: �8.57; 95 CI: �13.48, �3.66) were found as well. Finally, RS administration was associated with a significant decrease in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (WMD: �2.02; 95 CI: �3.14, �0.90). This meta-analysis showed beneficial effects of RS on improving FPG, insulin, HbA1c, total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and TNF-α levels in patients with MetS and related disorders, but it did not affect HOMA-IR, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, CRP and IL-6 levels. © 2019, © 2019 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: cited By 0
Subjects: Nutrition
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Basic Sciences > Department of Nutrition
Depositing User: ART . editor
Date Deposited: 24 Dec 2019 12:15
Last Modified: 24 Dec 2019 12:15
URI: http://eprints.kaums.ac.ir/id/eprint/4824

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