Comparing pregnancy, childbirth, and neonatal outcomes in women with different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome and healthy women: a prospective cohort study

Foroozanfard, F. and Asemi, Z. and Bazarganipour, F. and Taghavi, S.A. and Allan, H. and Aramesh, S. (2019) Comparing pregnancy, childbirth, and neonatal outcomes in women with different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome and healthy women: a prospective cohort study. Gynecological Endocrinology.

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy, childbirth, and neonatal outcomes in women with different phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) with healthy women. A prospective cohort study from the beginning to the end of pregnancy for 41 pregnant women with PCOS (case) and 49 healthy pregnant women (control) was completed. Based on the presence or absence of menstrual dysfunction (M), hyperandrogenism (HA), and polycystic ovaries (PCO) on ultrasound, the PCOS (case) group were divided into three phenotypes (HA + PCO (n = 22), M + PCO (n = 9), HA + M+PCO (n = 10). Pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, and lower birth weight among newborns were significantly higher in the PCOS case group compared to the control group especially in the phenotype HA + M+PCO (p <.05). High BMI (β = 2.40; p=.03) was the strongest predictor of pre-eclampsia in patients with PCOS. High androgen levels (free androgen index) (β = 13.71, 3.02; p <.05), was the strongest predictor of developing diabetes during pregnancy and reduced birth weight baby, respectively.These results suggest that PCOS, particularly in phenotype HA + M+PCO (p <.05), is a risk factor for adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes including gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia, and reduced weight babies. © 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: cited By 0
Subjects: Medicine
Midwifery
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Clinical Sciences > Department of , Obstetrics & Gynecology
Depositing User: ART . editor
Date Deposited: 29 Dec 2019 11:30
Last Modified: 29 Dec 2019 11:30
URI: http://eprints.kaums.ac.ir/id/eprint/4756

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