Molecular analysis and susceptibility pattern of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in emergency department patients and related risk factors in Iran

Rezaei, M. and Moniri, R. and Moosavi, G.A. (2015) Molecular analysis and susceptibility pattern of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in emergency department patients and related risk factors in Iran. Journal of Hospital Infection, 89 (3). pp. 186-191.

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Abstract

Background: Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become widespread in the hospital and in the community. Nasal colonization with MRSA has been identified as a risk factor for MRSA infection. Aim: To determine the prevalence of nasal colonization with MRSA among adult patients in the emergency department (ED) by considering the risk factors for MRSA carriage and antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 810 patients in the ED in Kashan, Iran. A questionnaire concerning the risk factors for MRSA colonization was completed for each patient. Specimens were obtained from the anterior nares. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used for SCC. mec typing, and a PCR assay was used to detect Panton-Valentine leukocidin (. PVL) genes. MRSA susceptibility to amikacin, clindamycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, penicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, tetracycline, vancomycin and cefoxitin was determined by the disc diffusion method. Findings: Two hundred and ninety-six (36.5) and 26 (3.2) out of 810 patients were S.aureus and MRSA nasal carriers, respectively. Of these, nine (34.6), seven (26.9), two (7.7), two (7.7), two (7.7), one (3.8) and one (3.8) MRSA isolates were classified as type V, III, I, IVb, IVh, II and IVa, respectively, and seven (26.9) MRSA isolates were non-typeable. PVL genes were not detected. All MRSA isolates were multi-drug resistant. Conclusion: A significant association was found between previous hospitalization, use of urinary and/or venous catheters and MRSA colonization. Further work on the epidemiology and risk factors for MRSA nasal colonization may be useful to guide the treatment and prevention of MRSA infections. © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: cited By 1
Uncontrolled Keywords: amikacin; cefoxitin; ciprofloxacin; clindamycin; cotrimoxazole; erythromycin; gentamicin; Panton Valentine leukocidin; penicillin derivative; tetracycline; vancomycin; anti-bacterial agents; bacterial proteins; bacterial toxins; Exotoxins; Leukocidins; mecA protein, Staphylococcus aureus; Panton-Valentine leukocidin, adult; aged; antibiotic sensitivity; Article; bacterial colonization; bacterial gene; bacterial strain; bladder catheterization; cross-sectional study; disk diffusion; emergency patient; emergency ward; female; hospitalization; human; infection risk; infection sensitivity; Iran; major clinical study; male; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection; minimum inhibitory concentration; multiplex polymerase chain reaction; questionnaire; smoking habit; very elderly; aged, 80 and over; carrier state; cross infection; cross-sectional studies; drug effects; Emergency Service, Hospital; epidemiology; Female; genetics; Humans; Iran; isolation and purification; Male; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; methods; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; microbiology; Middle Aged; Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction; Risk Factors; Staphylococcal Infections; statistics and numerical data; Young Adult, Adult; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bacterial Proteins; Bacterial Toxins; Carrier State; Cross Infection; Cross-Sectional Studies; Emergency Service, Hospital; Exotoxins; Female; Humans; Iran; Leukocidins; Male; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Middle Aged; Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction; Risk Factors; Staphylococcal Infections; Young Adult
Subjects: Immunology and Microbiology
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Basic Sciences > Department of Microbiology & Immunology
Depositing User: editor . 2
Date Deposited: 08 Mar 2017 14:14
Last Modified: 08 Mar 2017 14:14
URI: http://eprints.kaums.ac.ir/id/eprint/295

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