Vitamin D supplementation affects the beck depression inventory, insulin resistance, and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with major depressive disorder: A randomized, controlled clinical trial

Sepehrmanesh, Z. and Kolahdooz, F. and Abedi, F. and Mazroii, N. and Assarian, A. and Asemi, Z. and Esmaillzadeh, A. (2016) Vitamin D supplementation affects the beck depression inventory, insulin resistance, and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with major depressive disorder: A randomized, controlled clinical trial. Journal of Nutrition, 146 (2). pp. 243-248.

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Abstract

Background: Vitamin D may decrease depression symptoms through its beneficial effects on neurotransmitters, metabolic profiles, biomarkers of inflammation, and oxidative stress. Objective: This study was designed to assess whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce symptoms of depression, metabolic profiles, serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in 40 patients between 18 and 65 y of age with a diagnosis of MDD based on criteria from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either a single capsule of 50 kIU vitamin D/wk (n = 20) or placebo (n = 20) for 8 wk. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and postintervention to quantify relevant variables. The primary Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), which examines depressive symptoms and secondary (glucose homeostasis variables, lipid profiles, hs-CRP, and biomarkers of oxidative stress) outcomes were assessed. Results: Baseline concentrations of mean serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D were significantly different between the 2 groups (9.2 ± 6.0 and 13.6 ± 7.9 mg/L in the placebo and control groups, respectively, P = 0.02). After 8 wk of intervention, changes in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were significantly greater in the vitamin D group (+20.4 mg/L) than in the placebo group (20.9 mg/L, P < 0.001). A trend toward a greater decrease in the BDI was observed in the vitamin D group than in the placebo group (-8.0 and -3.3, respectively, P = 0.06). Changes in serum insulin (23.6 compared with +2.9 μIU/mL, P = 0.02), estimated homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (-1.0 compared with +0.6, P = 0.01), estimated homeostasis model assessment of β cell function (-13.9 compared with +10.3, P = 0.03), plasma total antioxidant capacity (+63.1 compared with -23.4 mmol/L, P = 0.04), and glutathione (+170 compared with -213 μmol/L, P = 0.04) in the vitamin D group were significantly different from those in the placebo group. Conclusion: Overall, vitamin D supplementation of patients with MDD for 8 wk had beneficial effects on the BDI, indicators of glucose homeostasis, and oxidative stress. This trial was registered at www.irct.ir as IRCT201412065623N29. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: cited By 3
Uncontrolled Keywords: 25-hydroxyvitamin D; antioxidant; C reactive protein; glucose blood level; insulin; vitamin D, adult; analogs and derivatives; blood; controlled study; depression; Depressive Disorder, Major; dietary supplement; double blind procedure; drug effects; female; glucose blood level; human; insulin resistance; male; metabolism; oxidative stress; randomized controlled trial, Adult; Antioxidants; Blood Glucose; C-Reactive Protein; Depression; Depressive Disorder, Major; Dietary Supplements; Double-Blind Method; Female; Humans; Insulin; Insulin Resistance; Male; Oxidative Stress; Vitamin D
Subjects: Nutrition
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Basic Sciences > Department of Nutrition
Depositing User: editor . 2
Date Deposited: 08 Mar 2017 18:32
Last Modified: 08 Mar 2017 18:32
URI: http://eprints.kaums.ac.ir/id/eprint/219

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