Preemptive analgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on postoperative pain: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Eidi, M. and Fazel, M.R. and Janzamini, M. and Haji Rezaei, M. and Moravveji, S.A. (2016) Preemptive analgesic effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on postoperative pain: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal, 18 (4).

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Abstract

Background: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological analgesic method used to control different types of pain. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of preoperative TENS on post inguinal hernia repair pain. Patients and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed on 66 male patients with unilateral inguinal hernias who were admitted to the Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan, Iran, from April to October 2014. Participants were selected using a convenience sampling method and were assigned to intervention (n = 33) and control (n = 33) groups using permuted-block randomization. Patients in the intervention group were treated with TENS 1 hour before surgery, while the placebo was administered to patients in the control group. All of the patients underwent inguinal hernia repair by the Lichtenstein method, and pain intensity was evaluated at 2, 4, 6, and 12 hours after surgery using a visual analogue scale. Additionally, the amounts of analgesic administered by pump were calculated and compared between the two groups. Results: The mean estimated postoperative pain intensity was 6.21 ± 1.63 in the intervention group and 5.45 ± 1.82 in the control group (P = 0.08). In the intervention group pain intensity at 2 and 4 hours after surgery were 3.54±1.48 and 5.12±1.41 (P < 0.001), respectively. In the control group these values were 4.0±1.5 and 4.76±1.39 (P = 0.04), respectively. No significant differences were observed in mean pain intensities at 6 and 12 hours. Conclusions: TENS can reduce postoperative pain in the early hours after inguinal hernia repair surgery. © 2016, Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: cited By 1
Uncontrolled Keywords: atracurium besilate; atropine; diclofenac; fentanyl; isoflurane; neostigmine; ondansetron; pethidine; thiopental, adult; analgesic activity; Article; artificial ventilation; controlled study; double blind procedure; hernioplasty; human; inguinal hernia; intravenous catheter; major clinical study; male; nausea and vomiting; pain intensity; patient controlled analgesia; postoperative pain; preoperative treatment; questionnaire; randomized controlled trial; transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation; visual analog scale
Subjects: Surgery
Divisions: Faculty of Medicine > Clinical Sciences > Department of Surgery
Depositing User: editor . 2
Date Deposited: 06 Mar 2017 17:03
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2017 17:03
URI: http://eprints.kaums.ac.ir/id/eprint/157

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