The Effects of Pregnancy-Adaptation Training on Maternal-Fetal Attachment and Adaptation in Pregnant Women With a History of Baby Loss

Baghdari, N. and Sadeghi Sahebzad, E. and Kheirkhah, M. and Azmoude, E. (2016) The Effects of Pregnancy-Adaptation Training on Maternal-Fetal Attachment and Adaptation in Pregnant Women With a History of Baby Loss. Nurs Midwifery Stud, 5 (2). e28949.

[img]
Preview
Text
The Effects of Pregnancy-Adaptation.pdf

Download (169kB) | Preview
Official URL: http://nmsjournal.com/?page=article&article_id=289...
DOI: UNSPECIFIED

Abstract

Background: Studies have shown that educating mothers can improve their adaptation to pregnancy and motherhood roles. There are also studies that have investigated the effects of certain interventions on maternal-fetal attachment. However, studies on the effects of maternal adaptation training on maternal-fetal attachment in mothers with a history of fetal or baby loss are rare. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a pregnancy adaptation training package on maternal-fetal attachment in pregnant women with a history of baby loss. Patients and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 60 pregnant women with previous fetal or neonatal death in 2014. The women were randomly divided into an experimental group (n = 30) and a control group (n = 30). The pregnant women in the experimental group received routine prenatal education in addition to four sessions of a pregnancy adaption training package. The control group received only routine prenatal education. The data were collected using a demographic questionnaire, Cranley’s maternal-fetal attachment scale, and a prenatal self-evaluation questionnaire at the beginning and at the end of the study. The data analysis was conducted using the Mann-Whitney U, Wilcoxon, chi-square, Fisher’s exact, and spearman correlation coefficient tests. Results: Before the intervention, there were no statistically significant differences between the study and control groups in terms of maternal-fetal attachment (P = 0.280) and adaptation to pregnancy (P = 0.883). However, following the intervention, the mean score of the maternal-fetal attachment was significantly higher in the experimental group, when compared with the control (77.57 ± 7.23 vs. 61.53 ± 2.62; P = 0.001). In addition, the mean post-intervention adaptation to pregnancy score was significantly lower in the experimental group than in the control group (118.89 ± 8.12 vs. 126.38 ± 4.17; P = 0.001). Conclusions: The pregnancy adaptation training package increased the adaptation and maternal-fetal attachment scores in pregnant women with a history of baby loss.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Midwifery
Divisions: Nursing and Midwifery Studies journal
Depositing User: ART . editor
Date Deposited: 04 May 2017 14:03
Last Modified: 11 Jul 2017 12:46
URI: http://eprints.kaums.ac.ir/id/eprint/1363

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item